Sunshine Recorder

London hand-drawn map by Jenni Sparks

London by Hand is a hand-drawn map of London, created by British artist Jenni Sparks for London-based art print producers Evermade. Based on a geographic map of the London metro system, the print replicates the streets, neighborhoods, and landmarks of the city, as well as highlighting lesser-known, quirkier shops, museums, and tidbits of local history. The birthplaces of british celebrities and locations of local markets are among the information depicted in hand-drawn letters and sketches. Jenni Sparks worked for two months to complete the map, which is sold here on the Evermade shop.


Free Scotland
Why the Scots want independence. 
Scotland’s nationalist ambitions don’t generally get international attention, but the past few weeks have been a uniquely exciting time in the long-running campaign for Scottish independence. On Jan. 25, Alex Salmond, Scotland’s first minister, and his Scottish National Party (SNP) government announced plans for a historic referendum on independence to be held in the fall of 2014, attracting coverage, comment, and curiosity from around the world.
The SNP government’s proposed question is “Do you agree that Scotland should be an independent country?” The SNP is  considering whether a second, as yet undefined question should be asked, suggesting an intermediate step of devolving powers to the Scottish  government without full independence. This notion, known as “devo max,” has the  support of a significant portion of public opinion — though this support remains  unmeasurable given that no serious detailed proposals have yet emerged.
London has not responded well to this development. In a speech on Feb. 16, British Prime Minister David Cameron vowed to   “fight with everything I have to keep our United Kingdom together.” He  continued: “To me, this is not some issue of policy or strategy or  calculation —  it matters head, heart, and soul. Our shared home is under threat and  everyone who cares about it needs to speak out.” In the end, Cameron may  find that this type of rhetoric will only hasten the demise of the  union he has vowed to protect.
Many are wondering why, exactly, this disquiet has emerged in Scotland. After all, the union has been a pretty peaceful one since at least the 17th century. But there is indeed a strong case to be made for an independent Scotland, a case that has only grown more compelling in light of Europe’s and Britain’s latest economic woes.

Free Scotland

Why the Scots want independence.

Scotland’s nationalist ambitions don’t generally get international attention, but the past few weeks have been a uniquely exciting time in the long-running campaign for Scottish independence. On Jan. 25, Alex Salmond, Scotland’s first minister, and his Scottish National Party (SNP) government announced plans for a historic referendum on independence to be held in the fall of 2014, attracting coverage, comment, and curiosity from around the world.

The SNP government’s proposed question is “Do you agree that Scotland should be an independent country?” The SNP is considering whether a second, as yet undefined question should be asked, suggesting an intermediate step of devolving powers to the Scottish government without full independence. This notion, known as “devo max,” has the support of a significant portion of public opinion — though this support remains unmeasurable given that no serious detailed proposals have yet emerged.

London has not responded well to this development. In a speech on Feb. 16, British Prime Minister David Cameron vowed to “fight with everything I have to keep our United Kingdom together.” He continued: “To me, this is not some issue of policy or strategy or calculation — it matters head, heart, and soul. Our shared home is under threat and everyone who cares about it needs to speak out.” In the end, Cameron may find that this type of rhetoric will only hasten the demise of the union he has vowed to protect.

Many are wondering why, exactly, this disquiet has emerged in Scotland. After all, the union has been a pretty peaceful one since at least the 17th century. But there is indeed a strong case to be made for an independent Scotland, a case that has only grown more compelling in light of Europe’s and Britain’s latest economic woes.